The Memorial Foundation has received $20,000 in grants from Legends Casino!

The Yakama Nation Legends Casino has generously funded three different programs that address patient emergency needs in the following areas:

North Star Lodge Cancer Center received $15,000 to support its cancer care fund which provides hardship assistance for patients who are forced to leave their employment during treatments, and for those who are uninsured, underinsured, or lack caregiver support.  This fund helps cancer patients who need transportation to and from appointments, prescription assistance, nutritional supplements, counseling and stress reduction programs.

Children’s Village received $2,500 for its emergency fund to assist families who face significant needs, unexpected obstacles, and extraordinary expenses associated with the medical costs of having a child with special needs.  This fund was established to fill in the gaps when no other options are available.

Cottage in the Meadow Hospice Care Center and Memorial Hospital’s Hospice Program received $2,500 to serve patients and families who are struggling significantly with their day to day financial existence, and the illness and impending death of their loved one magnifies these struggles.  The hospice emergency fund provides support and assistance to assure quality of life in the final stages of life’s journey.

Memorial

We are truly grateful to the Yakama Nation Legends Casino for their generosity!  These grants allow us to help those patients who have the greatest need while confronting extremely difficult medical challenges.

 

Leslie Whiteside

Grants Coordinator

 

 

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$2,000 grant funds developmental screening

The Memorial Foundation has received a $2,000 grant from the Pacific Power Foundation to fund developmental screening at Children’s Village!

This funding will support an important pilot project initiated by Children’s Village to implement developmental screening among physicians and childcare providers in Yakima County.  The goal is to screen all children from birth to age three for developmental delays and impairments in order to connect them with early learning and medical intervention services.  Early intervention reduces or eliminates the need for more expensive services later in life, and achieves the best possible outcomes for every child.

This project has further significance because Children’s Village serves as a developmental screening model for Washington State, as the Department of Health and Department of Early Learning plan to implement universal developmental screening on a statewide basis.

We are truly grateful for this gift from Pacific Power.  They have recognized that Children’s Village is at the forefront of innovation to serve children with special needs.

 

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$1,000 grant for Childbirth Education

The Memorial Foundation has received a $1,000 grant from Junior League of Yakima to fund a new childbirth education program called “Nutrition Before, During, and After Pregnancy.”

This is a program that Memorial Hospital has not offered in the past.  However, with obesity and diabetes rates on the rise, nutrition education is an issue at the forefront of overall health.  There are approximately 3,000 births at Memorial each year, and the hospital serves over 350 first time mothers each year through its Childbirth Education Program.

In 2012 Memorial conducted a needs assessment to find out what educational opportunities pregnant women would like to see offered.  Proper nutrition during pregnancy was voted as a top priority.  A registered dietician will instruct pregnant women about nutrition during pregnancy, healthy snack and meal choices, along with the importance of essential nutrients needed for a healthy pregnancy through breastfeeding.

We are very grateful to Junior League of Yakima!  Their generous grant allows us to offer this important pregnancy nutrition program for the first time.

 

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People Are Like Stained Glass Windows

People are like stained glass windows.  They sparkle and shine when the sun is out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is a light from within.

                                                                                                               Elisabeth Kübler-Ross

You need to talk to Flavia.  If you want to put your problems in perspective, and gain insight into inner strength and beauty, just speak with Flavia.

Flavia is the mother of a 15 year old boy with special needs who uses services at Children’s Village.   Her son has Down syndrome and is not able to speak.  Flavia left her family and her job as a music teacher in Argentina to come to the United States for her husband’s job.  Her son was only six at that time, and Flavia spoke no English and relied on her husband to navigate this new system, language, and culture that were completely foreign to her.  In a short amount of time, she and her husband divorced, leaving her alone with a child with special needs, no job, no family support, not many friends, and not able to speak English.

Yet Flavia did not despair.  She knew what she wanted for her son.  Through interpreters at Children’s Village she was able to find the medical resources and Parent to Parent support she needed, and at her son’s elementary school she was able to find a job as a paraprofessional in special education because she knew sign language and also became certified in Braille.

In fact, Flavia is grateful for her whole life experience.  She feels that she has no right to self-pity or sadness because she says there is so much opportunity in this country…..that you must live in a third world country to be able to understand and appreciate the abundant opportunities that the U.S. has to offer.

Flavia believes that having a child with special needs makes her a special mother too.  She believes that there is a reason for everything in our lives….that we are governed by a higher purpose.  Both of Flavia’s parents died one month before her divorce which gave her an additional reason to stay in the U.S.  She no longer had a strong family pull to return to Argentina, and despite her hardships, she saw opportunity for her son.  And wouldn’t you know that of anywhere in this country, she ended up in Yakima, Washington where we have the only collaborative model of its kind in the U.S. for children with special needs…..Children’s Village.

A light shines in the darkness.

Leslie Whiteside

Grants Coordinator

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Children’s Village just received a $70,000 grant for its Autism Diagnostics Program!

The office of the Attorney General of Washington has just awarded a $70,000 grant to Children’s Village through a competitive process in order to expand services for autism screening and diagnostics for children birth to 18 years of age.  The funding comes from a multi-state consumer protection settlement with Abbott Laboratories.  The court ordered the Attorney General’s Offices to use the funds to provide direct treatment, medication or counseling to people suffering from schizophrenia, dementia or autism.

Behavioral, social/emotional and mental health therapies at Children’s Village have been expanded in the last four years to provide more focused and purposeful programming for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.  Autism is on the rise among young children, and the need for intervention services has increased at Children’s Village and in area school districts.  In the past ten years, the incidence of Autism Spectrum Disorder has grown exponentially.  Current estimates are that one in every 88 children has autism, which affects an estimated 881 children in Yakima County.

Autism causes a wide range of social, emotional, behavioral and communicative disruptions.  Current research shows that early intervention can have a significant impact on the long-term learning experiences of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and is crucial to increasing positive outcomes later in life.  To that end, Children’s Villageprovides autism diagnostic services, professional and parent training, evidence-based practices and intervention, and community and family support.  As the primary service provider and only diagnostic center in Central Washington for autism, our goal is to increase the number of children diagnosed with autism before the age of five.

We are truly grateful for this gift.  Once again, Children’s Village is at the forefront of innovation to serve the children with special needs who call Yakima their home.

 

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Memorial Foundation receives $20,000 Grant for Developmental Screening

We are honored to receive a $20,000 grant from the Yakima Valley Community Foundation for Developmental Screening at Children’s Village! 

This funding will support an important pilot project initiated by Children’s Village, which is the first pilot to implement developmental screening among physicians and childcare providers in Yakima County.  The goal is to screen all children from birth to age three for developmental delays and impairments in order to connect them with early learning and medical intervention services.  Early intervention reduces or eliminates the need for more expensive services later in life, and achieves the best possible outcomes for every child.

This project has further significance beyond what it will accomplish for children in Yakima County.  Children’s Village will also serve as a developmental screening model for Washington State, as the Department of Health and Department of Early Learning plan to implement universal developmental screening on a statewide basis.

We are truly grateful for this gift.  Once again, Children’s Village is at the forefront of innovation to serve children with special needs.  And once again, The Memorial Foundation and the Yakima Valley Community Foundation are able to work together for the good of those who call Yakima their home.

 

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The Memorial Foundation Board of Trustees and the Hospice Steering Committee have won the Washington State Hospital Association’s Community Health Leadership Award for Cottage in the Meadow!

This award goes to The Memorial Foundation Board of Trustees and the Hospice Steering Committee for the outstanding work and dedication that they have invested over the past 5 years in research, community assessment, and fundraising efforts to develop this project. Cottage in the Meadow just opened in August 2012 and has already won a prestigious award! As the only free-standing hospice facility in central Washington that addresses end-of-life care for the terminally ill, Cottage in the Meadow is truly a gift to our community.

CONGRATULATIONS and THANK YOU to The Memorial Foundation Board of Trustees and the Hospice Steering Committee!

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A Vietnam Vet finds a new Neighborhood

“Our bodies are only the clothing our souls put on to participate in life.

                                                                                                                         Beverly Beckham

A Vietnam veteran suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder wandered the streets tormented by war memories.  People from his neighborhood knew and tolerated him.  He received mental health services, yet his ability to cope diminished.  His elderly parents feared his demise when they could no longer support him.

His arrival at Garden Village in Yakima was traumatic.  He screamed at people when approached.  His neck was hyper-extended creating safety concerns during his incessant, all day wandering.  His compulsive disorder included walking into multiple bathrooms and holding onto toilet flush handles which wasted water and disrupted their availability.  He couldn’t sleep, wouldn’t eat, and was very emaciated. His condition deteriorated.  It was assumed he would not survive long.

Over a year long journey, staff did not give up on him, which paid wonderful dividends.  Multiple prescriptions were reduced or removed from his medication regimen.  This veteran is now happier, talks (even softly) with others, can look people in the eye, smiles, and laughs.  He achieved a healthy weight and can obtain assistance without screaming.  He is able to sit still, enjoy the outdoors and sleep at night, which contributes greatly to his quality of life.  He moved from his childhood neighborhood into a Garden Village neighborhood where he is supported and accepted for who he is.

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Individuals with both medical and behavioral healthcare needs present a complex and often confusing challenge for diagnosis and treatment.  Yakima is fortunate to have Garden Village, our community’s only nonprofit skilled nursing facility whose mission is to help adult and elderly patients with medical conditions complicated by complex mental health problems, live successfully in the community.  Garden Village provides coordinated, integrated care for residents with all levels of Alzheimer’s disease, severe dementia and unstable mental illness.  It uses a “neighborhood” model of care as a successful alternative to conventional nursing home treatment, providing an environment where residents thrive.

 

Everyone participates in life.  Everyone deserves acceptance.

 

Leslie Whiteside

Grants Coordinator

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Everyone Matters

“Every person must have a place, must be here for a special reason, or no one has a place, or no one has a special reason for being.  Either everybody counts or nobody counts.”

Burton Blatt

I’ve been thinking about this quote for quite a while now.  I think about it when heated discussions arise between Democrats and Republicans, Christians and Muslims, Whites and Latinos, the “haves” and the “have nots.”  Our culture seems so intolerant and divided.

In contrast, I’ve been thinking about how Memorial Hospital addresses the needs of all individuals in our community.  Everyone matters.  As a nonprofit community hospital, Memorial is committed to reaching the underserved in our region.  Children’s Village is the only comprehensive collaborative for coordinated care in the Pacific Northwest for children with disabilities and special healthcare needs, and the only provider of autism diagnostic services in central Washington.  It serves children from 15 counties, and 85% of these children live in poverty and rely on Medicaid.  Nurse Family Partnership serves high risk, pregnant, first-time mothers (many who are teens) and stays with these women until their child is two years of age.  Of the patients that Memorial Hospital serves, 70% rely on Medicaid or Medicare, which means that Memorial provides more than $20 million in charity care to our community each year.  North Star Lodge Cancer Center is the only premier, award winning treatment facility of its kind in the Pacific Northwest, and offers all types of medical, radiation and chemotherapy services all located under one roof.  Cottage in the Meadow Hospice Care Center, which just opened in September 2012, is the only free-standing hospice facility in central Washington to address end-of-life care for the terminally ill.

Community outreach is the cornerstone of Memorial’s philosophy and priorities.  Yakima County has the highest poverty rate in the state at 24%, and Memorial provides a multitude of classes and programs focused on preventative health and education that are designed to meet the needs of our community.  Classes on many diseases and medical challenges include diabetes, cancer, cardiac care, chronic disease self-management, childbirth education, childhood obesity and women’s health.  Many of these courses and events are free of cost to participants, and all services are offered in English and Spanish to address the unique needs of our county’s significant Hispanic population.  Many recent immigrants are separated culturally, linguistically and geographically which creates enormous barriers to healthcare.  This population is further isolated due to low literacy levels and little knowledge of healthcare, and tends to have higher rates of chronic illness.  We realize the importance of reaching this underserved part of our community.  The health of a community is directly related to the health of the individuals in that community.  Memorial’s outreach programs provide more than $5.5 million each year in benefits to our community.

Everyone matters.

 

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Bhutan Documentary Seeking Funding

Ben Henretig is a friend of The Memorial Foundation, he created our series of micro documentaries for The Memorial Foundation, NICU and Children’s Village which you can view here

Ben is seeking to make a documentary about Bhutan, the remote mountain kingdom and this is his story…

“The purpose of life is the expansion of happiness. It is the goal of every other goal. Ben Henretig has embarked on an ambitious project to document a country and culture that has embraced Happiness as a part of its national policy” – Deepak Chopra

More information can be found at Ben’s site…

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